A Bangladeshi mourner and relative of a victim of the Rana Plaza building collapse reacts as she takes part in a protest marking the first anniversary of the disaster at the site where the building once stood in Savar on the outskirts of Dhaka on April 24, 2014. The Rana Plaza building collapsed on April 24, 2013, killing 1138 workers in the world’s worst garment factory disaster. Western fashion brands faced pressure to increase help for victims as mass protests marked the anniversary. Thousands of people, some wearing funeral shrouds, staged demonstrations at the site of the now-infamous Rana Plaza factory complex. (Munir uz Zaman/AFP Photo)
(via afp-photo)

A Bangladeshi mourner and relative of a victim of the Rana Plaza building collapse reacts as she takes part in a protest marking the first anniversary of the disaster at the site where the building once stood in Savar on the outskirts of Dhaka on April 24, 2014. The Rana Plaza building collapsed on April 24, 2013, killing 1138 workers in the world’s worst garment factory disaster. Western fashion brands faced pressure to increase help for victims as mass protests marked the anniversary. Thousands of people, some wearing funeral shrouds, staged demonstrations at the site of the now-infamous Rana Plaza factory complex. (Munir uz Zaman/AFP Photo)

(via afp-photo)

Ahmad holds up a photo of his sister in their family farm 20 years ago. He turns his eyes away while describing how after losing access to water, he had to find work in a nearby Jewish settlement. “I became a worker for an Israeli settler from Argentina… It was very painful to watch water running all day long in his farm while my farm, which is only a couple of miles away, was drying out.”A Thirsty Generation: Read More
(via theimeu)

Ahmad holds up a photo of his sister in their family farm 20 years ago. He turns his eyes away while describing how after losing access to water, he had to find work in a nearby Jewish settlement. 

“I became a worker for an Israeli settler from Argentina… It was very painful to watch water running all day long in his farm while my farm, which is only a couple of miles away, was drying out.”

A Thirsty Generation: Read More

(via theimeu)

Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)
Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.
For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.
Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana. 
Photos by George Osodi
(via dynamicafrica)

Africa’s mineral wealth and abundant natural resources are no secret. What we also know of much of these commodities is that, in many African countries, the profits yielded from the industries established with the purpose of securing the wealth and inheritance of the citizens of these nations, more often than not, end up in the hands of greedy politicians, easily bribed leaders, and in the pockets of the mostly foreign multinational CEOs and the companies they work for.

For decades, this has been the narrative of a dire situation that only seems to be worsening, and having equally devastating effects in both the lives of those who live in these areas, and the environment surrounding them.

Nigerian photographer, George Osodi, who comes from Nigeria’s oil rich southeastern Niger Delta region, has seen firsthand just how disastrous and traumatic the exploitation of these communities and the natural resources in these regions they occupy can be. These images show two specific areas where these distressing conditions have become the norm - in Nigeria’s Niger Delta region, and in an illegal gold mine in Ghana

Photos by George Osodi

(via dynamicafrica)

Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)
Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.
I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans. And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.
— Fabio Sgroi
A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.
(via elisebrown)

Prolaz, project about the continuous change experienced in the Balkans over the last years. It’s about the complexity of the human condition during the region’s transition toward democracy. It’s a personal view on the tension and the contradiction occurring here.

I started my journey in 2004 from Istanbul, I decided to start from Turkey, to capture the influence of Ottoman Empire in the Balkans.
And continue in subsequent years in different cities and surroundings from Albania, Bosnia, Bucharest, Croatia, Hezegovina, Kosovo, Istanbul, Macedonia, Montenegro, Sofia, Serbia, Skopje, Thessaloniki.

— Fabio Sgroi

A land of unsure boundaries, where opposites both attract and repel each other. The last decade has violently changed the physical and psychological dimension of these towns, evolving them into a nationalist drama and perhaps the conclusion of an irreversible sense of their own being. Nevertheless, there are vibrant feelings of hope and fear, stemming from the people’s conflicting sense of their cultural heritage.

(via elisebrown)

Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.

Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014

Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.

Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Captions: 

1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.

3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.

5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.

7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.

9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.

10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.