Day 23: Israel strikes on another UN school serving as a refugee shelter & crowded market in Shejaiya during ceasefire as Gaza death toll passes 1,350 | July 30, 2014

Faiza Al-Tanboura had not spoken for 21 days since a missile strike destroyed her home. In the early hours of the morning she found her voice: “The children. Don’t let them kill the children,” she shouted as she ran out into the playground of a UN school under Israeli tank fire.

Three thousand people have squashed into Jabaliya Elementary Girls’ School since the Israeli military warned people to leave their homes and neighbourhoods or risk death under intense bombardment. Classroom Number 1, just inside the school’s entrance, had become home to about 40, mostly women and children.

The first shell came just after the early morning call to prayer, when most of those taking shelter in a United Nations school in Jabaliya refugee camp were asleep, crammed into classrooms with what few possessions they had managed to snatch when they fled their homes. Minutes later, a second shell slammed through the roof of the two-storey school.

At least 15 people, mostly children and women, died when the school in Jabaliya refugee camp was hit by five shells during a night of relentless bombardment across Gaza. More than 100 people were injured.

Pierre Krähenbühl, commissioner-general of the UN agency for Palestinian refugees, UNRWA, said the shelling of the school was a “serious violation of international law by Israeli forces”.

He said: “Last night, children were killed as they slept next to their parents on the floor of a classroom in a UN-designated shelter in Gaza. Children killed in their sleep; this is an affront to all of us, a source of universal shame. Today the world stands disgraced.”

Christopher Gunness, the UNRWA’s spokesman, said “precise location of the school was communicated to Israeli army 17 times.” 

The attack on the school was the sixth time that UNRWA premises have been hit since the Israeli assault on Gaza began more than three weeks ago, the UN said.

In the evening, after Israel had declared a four hour humanitarian ceasefire, came another attack, on a busy market in Shejaiyah, between Gaza City and the Israeli border. At least 15 people were killed, including Rami Rayan, a Palestinian journalist wearing a press vest, and another 200 people wounded. 

At least 110 people were killed across Gaza on Wednesday, July 30, bringing the total Palestinian death toll to more than 1,350.

Photos: 

1. People inspect the damage outside the school. (Wissam Nassar for The New York Times)

2. A Palestinian child, wounded in an Israeli strike in a UN school, receives treatment at Kamal Edwan hospital. (Mohammed Abed/AFP/Getty Images)

3. Palestinians who lost relatives in an Israeli strike in a UN school in Jabalia refugee camp in the northern Gaza Strip, mourn outside the Kamal Edwan hospital in Beit Lahia where victims from the attack were brought. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images)

4. A Palestinian man inspects the damage at a UN school at the Jabalia refugee camp. (Mahmud Hams/AFP/Getty Images)

5. A Palestinians boy looks at the sky after hearing a fighter jet releasing flares, as he stands by a donkey killed by an Israeli strike earlier, at and around the adjacent Abu Hussein U.N. school, seen in background, in Jebaliya refugee camp. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

6. A Palestinian man grieves for relatives who were killed in an Israeli airstrike at a U.N. school in the Jabaliya refugee camp, at the Kamal Adwan hospital in Beit Lahiya. (Khalil Hamra/AP)

7. A Palestinian man pictured through a damaged classroom carries a boy as he walks at a United Nations-run school sheltering Palestinians displaced by an Israeli ground offensive. (Suhaib Salem/Reuters)

8. Palestinians mourn the death of a relative, who died when a UN school used as a shelter for internally displace people came under Israeli shelling in the Kamal Adwan hospital in Beit Lahia. (Oliver Weiken/EPA)

9. Palestinians collect human remains from a classroom inside a UN school in the Jabalia refugee camp. (Marco Longari/AFP/Getty Images)

10. Relatives carry the body of a child killed during the shelling of the school. (Sergey Ponomarev for The New York Times)

(Sources: 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9)

I know I'm ignorant, but can you please tell me what is the real and the causes of the gaza conflict?

asked by Anonymous

This is a great piece from New Yorker written by Rashid Khalidi, which I think is worth reading, and take it as an answer to your question please. 

"When you imprison 1.8 million people in a hundred and forty square miles, about a third of the area of New York City, with no control of borders, almost no access to the sea for fishermen, no real way in or out, and with drones buzzing overhead night and day… eventually, the ghetto will fight back. It was true in Soweto and Belfast, and it is true in Gaza. We might not like Hamas or some of its methods, but that is not the same as accepting the proposition that Palestinians should supinely accept the denial of their right to exist as a free people in their ancestral homeland."

Read the rest here: “Collective Punishment in Gaza

Jehad Saftawi, IMEU:

"During the brief ceasefire on July 26, I traveled to Shoja’ea, a neighborhood in Gaza that was heavily bombarded by Israel a few days prior, resulting in close to 90 deaths in just one day. Dozens of houses and streets were destroyed. It looked like everything there was a target — humans, animals, and every stone. I felt like I was dreaming. I couldn’t believe how much destruction there was everywhere I looked. The people’s faces, some returning to their homes and some journalists, were pale and shocked. Many couldn’t find their homes and in some cases, even their streets, as the features of the neighborhood had changed completely.

Remains of missiles were everywhere, many of them unexploded. I spoke to someone who was stuck in Shoja’ea for eight days. He said that he couldn’t hear us clearly because his hearing was damaged by the explosions that were around him for so long. He said that he had very little to eat in the past few days, only olives and peppers, and had no connection with the outside world because the electricity and cell phone connections were both out.

After leaving Shoja’ea, I and several other journalists tried to enter the Khuzaa area in eastern Khan Younis, which was intensively bombed by Israeli tanks as well, but Israeli forces did not allow it. We heard warning gunshots and had to turn back. The stories of Khuzaa’s people will stay unshared with the the world for now.”

See more photos.

A Palestinian looks for human remains in a cemetery destroyed by an Israeli missile strike in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Monday marked the beginning of the three-day Eid al-Fitr holiday, which caps the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Muslims usually start the day by visiting cemeteries, to pay their respects to the dead, and then exchange family visits. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)

A Palestinian looks for human remains in a cemetery destroyed by an Israeli missile strike in the northern Gaza Strip on July 28, 2014. Monday marked the beginning of the three-day Eid al-Fitr holiday, which caps the Muslim fasting month of Ramadan. Muslims usually start the day by visiting cemeteries, to pay their respects to the dead, and then exchange family visits. (Lefteris Pitarakis/AP)