Tag: Afghanistan

Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.
Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014
Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images
Captions: 
1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.
3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.
5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.
7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.
8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.
9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.
10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.

Kabul, Afghanistan | April 13, 2014

Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around seven USD on an average working day. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.

Photos by Shah Marai/AFP/Getty Images

Captions: 

1. Afghan day labourer Ibrahim, 43, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

2. Afghan day labourers take a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people.

3. Afghan day labourer Chaman, 37, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

4. Afghan day labourers shovel coal at a coal yard. Coal labourers work an average of eight hours a day filling trucks with coal, each earning around 7 dollars on an average working day.

5. Afghan day labourer Saeed Ali, 22, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

6. Afghan day labourers play cards while taking a break after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard.

7. Afghan day labourer Hamin, 54, poses at a coal yard where he works on the outskirts of Kabul.

8. Afghan day labourers eat lunch in a shared room after loading coal onto a truck at a coal yard. To cut the high cost of living the labourers live in rooms housing 18-20 people, on a diet that usually consists of tea and bread.

9. An Afghan day labourer prays after loading coal trucks on the outskirts of Kabul. Most of them come from the northern provinces, leaving their families behind in search of fortune in the capital.

10. An Afghan day labourer shovels coal at a coal yard.

In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.
In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus
Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.
An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.
Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.
Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.
Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 
She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.

In Memoriam: Anja Niedringhaus

Anja Niedringhaus, a courageous and immensely talented Associated Press photographer, was killed while covering elections in Afghanistan on April 4, 2014.

An Afghan police officer opened fire on Anja Niedringhaus and Kathy Gannon from the Associated Press in a police headquarters in Khost province, after the women arrived with a convoy of election materials on Friday.

Niedringhaus died almost immediately from wounds to her head, a health official said, and Gannon was taken to hospital with less serious injuries after being shot twice. She later underwent surgery and was described as being in stable condition and talking to medical personnel. Both were veteran correspondents with long experience covering Afghanistan.

Afghanistan, once a relatively safe place to work, has become increasingly deadly for journalists in the run up to the elections. Just last month Swedish-British radio reporter Nils Horner was shot dead in downtown Kabul. Days later Sardar Ahmad of the Agence France Press was gunned down, along with his wife and two children, in an attack on a luxury hotel in Kabul. His youngest son, two-year-old Abuzar, survived several gunshot wounds.

Niedringhaus has long been recognized for her expertise in gaining a subject’s trust and photographing them with a style that is immediately recognizable. Her attention to detail, composition and light come together to not only tell insightful stories but also to create works of art. 

She worked for the European Press Photo Agency before joining the AP in 2002, based in Geneva. She had published two books. She was the only woman on a team of 11 AP photographers awarded the 2005 Pulitzer Prize for breaking news photography.