A girl looks at lanterns as she visits the Shanghai International Lantern Festival in Luxun Park in Shanghai, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. According to Chinese tradition, people try to solve puzzles on lanterns, eat Yuanxiao (glutinous rice ball) and enjoy family reunions during the festival. The Lantern Festival is usually celebrated in winter, but in Shanghai, participants prefer to mark the festival at the end of summer to enjoy the warmer weather.
[Credit : Carlos Barria / Reuters]

A girl looks at lanterns as she visits the Shanghai International Lantern Festival in Luxun Park in Shanghai, Wednesday, Sept. 12, 2012. According to Chinese tradition, people try to solve puzzles on lanterns, eat Yuanxiao (glutinous rice ball) and enjoy family reunions during the festival. The Lantern Festival is usually celebrated in winter, but in Shanghai, participants prefer to mark the festival at the end of summer to enjoy the warmer weather.

[Credit : Carlos Barria / Reuters]

Kanga Ihamo, 3, an ethnic Tibetan girl, stands inside of her’s family tent at a makeshift camp for people affected by the 2010 earthquake in Yushu, Qinghai province, China, April 23, 2012. Two years after the quake that shook a remote, mountainous corner of the Qinghai province, thousands of people are still living at the makeshift camp waiting to be relocated into new houses. Latest reports of the death toll has reached 2,698, according to Xinhua news agency.  
[Credit : Carlos Barria/Reuters]

Kanga Ihamo, 3, an ethnic Tibetan girl, stands inside of her’s family tent at a makeshift camp for people affected by the 2010 earthquake in Yushu, Qinghai province, China, April 23, 2012. Two years after the quake that shook a remote, mountainous corner of the Qinghai province, thousands of people are still living at the makeshift camp waiting to be relocated into new houses. Latest reports of the death toll has reached 2,698, according to Xinhua news agency.  

[Credit : Carlos Barria/Reuters]

A young monk watched an elder monk as they prepared to pray Tuesday, Feb. 21 at the Labrang Monastery in Xiahe, Gansu Province, China, ahead of the Tibetan New Year. Tibetan New Year is usually a time for festivities in China’s ethnically Tibetan areas, but this year some are choosing not to celebrate after deadly unrest and a huge security clampdown. Chinese authorities have implemented what some experts say are unprecedented measures of control on vast swathes of ethnically Tibetan regions following a wave of self-immolations by Buddhist monks and nuns.
[Credit : Carlos Barria/Reuters]

A young monk watched an elder monk as they prepared to pray Tuesday, Feb. 21 at the Labrang Monastery in Xiahe, Gansu Province, China, ahead of the Tibetan New Year. Tibetan New Year is usually a time for festivities in China’s ethnically Tibetan areas, but this year some are choosing not to celebrate after deadly unrest and a huge security clampdown. Chinese authorities have implemented what some experts say are unprecedented measures of control on vast swathes of ethnically Tibetan regions following a wave of self-immolations by Buddhist monks and nuns.

[Credit : Carlos Barria/Reuters]

An ethnic Tibetan elder woman sits at her house near Danba, Sichuan Province January 26, 2012. Ethnic tension simmered in remote corners of China’s southwestern Sichuan province on Thursday after security forces fired on demonstrators in a series of deadly clashes that Tibet’s government in exile condemned as “gruesome”.
[Credit : Carlos Barria/Reuters]

An ethnic Tibetan elder woman sits at her house near Danba, Sichuan Province January 26, 2012. Ethnic tension simmered in remote corners of China’s southwestern Sichuan province on Thursday after security forces fired on demonstrators in a series of deadly clashes that Tibet’s government in exile condemned as “gruesome”.

[Credit : Carlos Barria/Reuters]