reportagebygettyimages:

Hoping to be given leftovers, ten-year Switan looks into the window of a restaurant while begging for food in Kabul, Afghanistan on January 13, 2002. Switan also collects between 50,000 to 70,000 Afghani per day (about $2.50 USD) while begging for money from foreigners. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)
Bronstein has spent over a decade documenting the war-ravaged lives of the Afghan people. See more, and support Bronstein’s project Afghanistan: Between Life and War, here

reportagebygettyimages:

Hoping to be given leftovers, ten-year Switan looks into the window of a restaurant while begging for food in Kabul, Afghanistan on January 13, 2002. Switan also collects between 50,000 to 70,000 Afghani per day (about $2.50 USD) while begging for money from foreigners. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Getty Images)

Bronstein has spent over a decade documenting the war-ravaged lives of the Afghan people. See more, and support Bronstein’s project Afghanistan: Between Life and War, here

reportagebygettyimages:

'Afghanistan: Between Life and War'
Afghanistan is a country that much reported on in the West but little understood, says Paula Bronstein, a photojournalist who has worked in the country on and off for the last 12 years. In her proposed book, “Afghanistan: Between Life and War,” she attempts to show how the Afghan people constructed their lives against the backdrop of incessant war and Taliban insurgency, and hopes to provide a voice to people who have none.
Paula has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funding for the book and must reach her goal by Sunday, Dec. 7.
Paula, who is represented by Reportage by Getty Images, is an award-winning and internationally published photojournalist with over 30 years in the business. Originally from Boston, Bronstein worked for newspapers including The Hartford Courant and The Chicago Tribune before moving overseas to Thailand in 1998 to cover the Asian region including Afghanistan and Pakistan. She spent more than a decade as a Getty Images staff photographer, documenting disasters, conflict, and political unrest around the world. View some of her past work on the Reportage Web site.
Caption: An Afghan woman with severe burns on 45% of her body from self-immolation shows her scars at a hospital in Herat. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Reportage by Getty Images)

reportagebygettyimages:

'Afghanistan: Between Life and War'

Afghanistan is a country that much reported on in the West but little understood, says Paula Bronstein, a photojournalist who has worked in the country on and off for the last 12 years. In her proposed book, “Afghanistan: Between Life and War,” she attempts to show how the Afghan people constructed their lives against the backdrop of incessant war and Taliban insurgency, and hopes to provide a voice to people who have none.

Paula has launched a Kickstarter campaign to raise funding for the book and must reach her goal by Sunday, Dec. 7.

Paula, who is represented by Reportage by Getty Images, is an award-winning and internationally published photojournalist with over 30 years in the business. Originally from Boston, Bronstein worked for newspapers including The Hartford Courant and The Chicago Tribune before moving overseas to Thailand in 1998 to cover the Asian region including Afghanistan and Pakistan. She spent more than a decade as a Getty Images staff photographer, documenting disasters, conflict, and political unrest around the world. View some of her past work on the Reportage Web site.

Caption: An Afghan woman with severe burns on 45% of her body from self-immolation shows her scars at a hospital in Herat. (Photo by Paula Bronstein/Reportage by Getty Images)

A construction worker who lives on the site of a new convention center sits outside his shack with his dog August 16, 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. A construction boom has taken over the capital city, creating more sprawling shopping malls, hotels and apartment buildings. Some experts say that the development is not sustainable without proper planning.
[Credit : Paula Bronstein/Getty Images]

A construction worker who lives on the site of a new convention center sits outside his shack with his dog August 16, 2013 in Bangkok, Thailand. A construction boom has taken over the capital city, creating more sprawling shopping malls, hotels and apartment buildings. Some experts say that the development is not sustainable without proper planning.

[Credit : Paula Bronstein/Getty Images]

reportagebygettyimages:

Bringing Images Home to Afghanistan
This photo by Paula Bronstein, of an Afghan electrician at work in 2006, is included in an outdoor exhibition in Kabul called Streets of Afghanistan.  Exhibition director Shannon Galpin explains the purpose of the show:

‘Really what we wanted to do is bring these images home, because in Afghanistan images are taken every day.  People from around the world are in Afghanistan as journalists and photojournalists taking pictures that will never be seen by Afghans.  This is something that has never been done before; a collaboration of life-size photography used as street art.’ 

reportagebygettyimages:

Bringing Images Home to Afghanistan

This photo by Paula Bronstein, of an Afghan electrician at work in 2006, is included in an outdoor exhibition in Kabul called Streets of Afghanistan.  Exhibition director Shannon Galpin explains the purpose of the show:

‘Really what we wanted to do is bring these images home, because in Afghanistan images are taken every day.  People from around the world are in Afghanistan as journalists and photojournalists taking pictures that will never be seen by Afghans.  This is something that has never been done before; a collaboration of life-size photography used as street art.’ 

An Akha Hilltribe woman picks Oolong #17 tea leaves during a harvest at the Suwirun Tea farm in the hills outside of Chaing Rai, on November 11, 2012 in Chiang Rai, Thailand. There are around 40 Akha hill tribe workers and 120 Burmese making 300 Bhat a day working on the family run Suwirun Organic tea farm. The farm has been in business around 38 years. The Tea is harvested every 45 days; collecting about 1.5 tons on average per harvest. On special occasions the Akha wear their traditional dress while picking tea. These days it is most commonly worn for tour groups and ceremonies.
[Credit : Paula Bronstein/Getty Images]

An Akha Hilltribe woman picks Oolong #17 tea leaves during a harvest at the Suwirun Tea farm in the hills outside of Chaing Rai, on November 11, 2012 in Chiang Rai, Thailand. There are around 40 Akha hill tribe workers and 120 Burmese making 300 Bhat a day working on the family run Suwirun Organic tea farm. The farm has been in business around 38 years. The Tea is harvested every 45 days; collecting about 1.5 tons on average per harvest. On special occasions the Akha wear their traditional dress while picking tea. These days it is most commonly worn for tour groups and ceremonies.

[Credit : Paula Bronstein/Getty Images]

A man stands next to the door of his room under a bridge in Manila on August 21, 2012. Families cram into small rooms under a bridge so they can live for free. Manila’s population of 20 million people is rising by approximately a quarter of a million every year. Due to overcrowding a third of the Filipino capital’s residents are forced to live on any bit of spare land they can manage, often in makeshift settlements under bridges, beside railway lines and even in cemeteries.
[Credit : Paula Bronstein / Getty Images]

A man stands next to the door of his room under a bridge in Manila on August 21, 2012. Families cram into small rooms under a bridge so they can live for free. Manila’s population of 20 million people is rising by approximately a quarter of a million every year. Due to overcrowding a third of the Filipino capital’s residents are forced to live on any bit of spare land they can manage, often in makeshift settlements under bridges, beside railway lines and even in cemeteries.

[Credit : Paula Bronstein / Getty Images]

Children look out from their home in as more rain falls in the flooded coastal region August 14, 2012 in Bulacan, Philippines. A major topical storm has hit the Northern Luzon bringing days of wet weather to a region still recovering from massive flooding. According to the Office of Civil Defense the floods have left at least 96 people dead with the flooding effecting up to 2.68 million people, including more than 440,000 fleeing to evacuation centers, in Manila and surrounding provinces.
[Credit : Paula Bronstein/Getty Images]

Children look out from their home in as more rain falls in the flooded coastal region August 14, 2012 in Bulacan, Philippines. A major topical storm has hit the Northern Luzon bringing days of wet weather to a region still recovering from massive flooding. According to the Office of Civil Defense the floods have left at least 96 people dead with the flooding effecting up to 2.68 million people, including more than 440,000 fleeing to evacuation centers, in Manila and surrounding provinces.

[Credit : Paula Bronstein/Getty Images]