Tag: Rafiq Maqbool

An Indian man, seen on the left through the window glass of a three wheeler, walks on a street with an umbrella as it rains in Mumbai, India, Monday, Sept. 3, 2012. The monsoon rains which usually hit India from June to September are crucial for farmers whose crops feed hundreds of millions of people.
[Credit : Rafiq Maqbool/AP]

An Indian man, seen on the left through the window glass of a three wheeler, walks on a street with an umbrella as it rains in Mumbai, India, Monday, Sept. 3, 2012. The monsoon rains which usually hit India from June to September are crucial for farmers whose crops feed hundreds of millions of people.

[Credit : Rafiq Maqbool/AP]

Devotees form a human pyramid to break the “Dahi handi,” an earthen pot filled with curd, an integral part of celebrations to mark Janmashtami in Mumbai, India, Friday, Aug 10, 2012. Janmashtami is the festival that marks the birth of Hindu God Krishna.
[Credit : Rafiq Maqbool / AP]

Devotees form a human pyramid to break the “Dahi handi,” an earthen pot filled with curd, an integral part of celebrations to mark Janmashtami in Mumbai, India, Friday, Aug 10, 2012. Janmashtami is the festival that marks the birth of Hindu God Krishna.

[Credit : Rafiq Maqbool / AP]

Eleven-year-old Sagira Ansari, right, rolls bidi tobacco with her family at their house in Dhuliyan, in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, March 18, 2012. Sagira Ansari, 11, is among hundreds of thousands of children toiling in the hidden corners of rural India, working in hazardous industries crucial to the economy.
Nearly every child in Sagira’s town of Dhuliyan works through the tobacco dust to feed India’s near limitless demand for the thin, tight cigarettes, known as bidis. Sagira and her family earn 75 rupees ($1.50) for every 1,000 bidis rolled which brings in about 7,500 rupees ($150) a month.
[Credit : Rafiq Maqbool / AP]

Eleven-year-old Sagira Ansari, right, rolls bidi tobacco with her family at their house in Dhuliyan, in the eastern Indian state of West Bengal, March 18, 2012. Sagira Ansari, 11, is among hundreds of thousands of children toiling in the hidden corners of rural India, working in hazardous industries crucial to the economy.

Nearly every child in Sagira’s town of Dhuliyan works through the tobacco dust to feed India’s near limitless demand for the thin, tight cigarettes, known as bidis. Sagira and her family earn 75 rupees ($1.50) for every 1,000 bidis rolled which brings in about 7,500 rupees ($150) a month.

[Credit : Rafiq Maqbool / AP]