Tag: brazil

A Munduruku woman warrior carries a monkey on her head while on a search for illegal gold mines and miners in their territory, near the Kadiriri river, a tributary of the Tapajos and Amazon rivers in western Para state on January 25, 2014.
The Munduruku tribe has seen their land encroached on by wildcat miners in search of gold, and the tribe’s leaders travelled to the capital Brasilia last year to demand the federal government remove non-indigenous miners from their territory. Rather than wait for a court decision to start the process - which could take years - the Munduruku decided to take matters into their own hands and expel the wildcat miners. (Lunae Parracho/Reuters)

A Munduruku woman warrior carries a monkey on her head while on a search for illegal gold mines and miners in their territory, near the Kadiriri river, a tributary of the Tapajos and Amazon rivers in western Para state on January 25, 2014.

The Munduruku tribe has seen their land encroached on by wildcat miners in search of gold, and the tribe’s leaders travelled to the capital Brasilia last year to demand the federal government remove non-indigenous miners from their territory. Rather than wait for a court decision to start the process - which could take years - the Munduruku decided to take matters into their own hands and expel the wildcat miners. (Lunae Parracho/Reuters)

Linda Forsell. Cause of Death: Woman 
Intimate Partner Violence
The one you love, you beat. – proverb, Sweden
More than a third of all women in the world are subjected to physical or sexual violence during their lifetime. The most common type is Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) which one out of three women have to suffer. No country, and no economical class or age is exempted; and it has dire effects. Depression, alcohol abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and physical injuries are merely part of the outcome.
About the project
Cause of Death: Woman is a unique investigative report on violence against women in the world, describing atrocities ranging from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and acid attacks to more hidden types like psychological and physical violence between partners and rape.
Between 2010 and 2012 Linda Forsell documented the situation in ten countries together with reporters Karin Alfredsson and Kerstin Weigl. The countries included in the project are the USA, South Africa, Egypt, Sweden, Pakistan, Mexico, Brazil, Congo, Spain and Russia.
The primary result of the work is www.causeofdeathwoman.com, an open resource for anyone who is interested, but with large focus on reaching out through organizations, schools, workshops and lectures around the world.
1. South Africa: The first time Elizabeth’s boyfriend beat her she was 16. Her boyfriend used to say to her: “You’re a dog. How can you expect anyone to love you when even your own mother doesn’t?”
2. Russia: Svetlana is forced to live with her husband that she has filed a lawsuit against for abusing her. The situation is common in Russia where housing is extremely scarce.
3. Sweden.
4. Brazil: Rosangela says she has survived twice. First when her husband threw petrol over her and set her alight – and then the negligence at the hospital.
(via darksilenceinsuburbia)
Linda Forsell. Cause of Death: Woman 
Intimate Partner Violence
The one you love, you beat. – proverb, Sweden
More than a third of all women in the world are subjected to physical or sexual violence during their lifetime. The most common type is Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) which one out of three women have to suffer. No country, and no economical class or age is exempted; and it has dire effects. Depression, alcohol abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and physical injuries are merely part of the outcome.
About the project
Cause of Death: Woman is a unique investigative report on violence against women in the world, describing atrocities ranging from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and acid attacks to more hidden types like psychological and physical violence between partners and rape.
Between 2010 and 2012 Linda Forsell documented the situation in ten countries together with reporters Karin Alfredsson and Kerstin Weigl. The countries included in the project are the USA, South Africa, Egypt, Sweden, Pakistan, Mexico, Brazil, Congo, Spain and Russia.
The primary result of the work is www.causeofdeathwoman.com, an open resource for anyone who is interested, but with large focus on reaching out through organizations, schools, workshops and lectures around the world.
1. South Africa: The first time Elizabeth’s boyfriend beat her she was 16. Her boyfriend used to say to her: “You’re a dog. How can you expect anyone to love you when even your own mother doesn’t?”
2. Russia: Svetlana is forced to live with her husband that she has filed a lawsuit against for abusing her. The situation is common in Russia where housing is extremely scarce.
3. Sweden.
4. Brazil: Rosangela says she has survived twice. First when her husband threw petrol over her and set her alight – and then the negligence at the hospital.
(via darksilenceinsuburbia)
Linda Forsell. Cause of Death: Woman 
Intimate Partner Violence
The one you love, you beat. – proverb, Sweden
More than a third of all women in the world are subjected to physical or sexual violence during their lifetime. The most common type is Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) which one out of three women have to suffer. No country, and no economical class or age is exempted; and it has dire effects. Depression, alcohol abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and physical injuries are merely part of the outcome.
About the project
Cause of Death: Woman is a unique investigative report on violence against women in the world, describing atrocities ranging from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and acid attacks to more hidden types like psychological and physical violence between partners and rape.
Between 2010 and 2012 Linda Forsell documented the situation in ten countries together with reporters Karin Alfredsson and Kerstin Weigl. The countries included in the project are the USA, South Africa, Egypt, Sweden, Pakistan, Mexico, Brazil, Congo, Spain and Russia.
The primary result of the work is www.causeofdeathwoman.com, an open resource for anyone who is interested, but with large focus on reaching out through organizations, schools, workshops and lectures around the world.
1. South Africa: The first time Elizabeth’s boyfriend beat her she was 16. Her boyfriend used to say to her: “You’re a dog. How can you expect anyone to love you when even your own mother doesn’t?”
2. Russia: Svetlana is forced to live with her husband that she has filed a lawsuit against for abusing her. The situation is common in Russia where housing is extremely scarce.
3. Sweden.
4. Brazil: Rosangela says she has survived twice. First when her husband threw petrol over her and set her alight – and then the negligence at the hospital.
(via darksilenceinsuburbia)
Linda Forsell. Cause of Death: Woman 
Intimate Partner Violence
The one you love, you beat. – proverb, Sweden
More than a third of all women in the world are subjected to physical or sexual violence during their lifetime. The most common type is Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) which one out of three women have to suffer. No country, and no economical class or age is exempted; and it has dire effects. Depression, alcohol abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and physical injuries are merely part of the outcome.
About the project
Cause of Death: Woman is a unique investigative report on violence against women in the world, describing atrocities ranging from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and acid attacks to more hidden types like psychological and physical violence between partners and rape.
Between 2010 and 2012 Linda Forsell documented the situation in ten countries together with reporters Karin Alfredsson and Kerstin Weigl. The countries included in the project are the USA, South Africa, Egypt, Sweden, Pakistan, Mexico, Brazil, Congo, Spain and Russia.
The primary result of the work is www.causeofdeathwoman.com, an open resource for anyone who is interested, but with large focus on reaching out through organizations, schools, workshops and lectures around the world.
1. South Africa: The first time Elizabeth’s boyfriend beat her she was 16. Her boyfriend used to say to her: “You’re a dog. How can you expect anyone to love you when even your own mother doesn’t?”
2. Russia: Svetlana is forced to live with her husband that she has filed a lawsuit against for abusing her. The situation is common in Russia where housing is extremely scarce.
3. Sweden.
4. Brazil: Rosangela says she has survived twice. First when her husband threw petrol over her and set her alight – and then the negligence at the hospital.
(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Linda Forsell. Cause of Death: Woman 

Intimate Partner Violence

The one you love, you beat. – proverb, Sweden

More than a third of all women in the world are subjected to physical or sexual violence during their lifetime. The most common type is Intimate Partner Violence (IPV) which one out of three women have to suffer. No country, and no economical class or age is exempted; and it has dire effects. Depression, alcohol abuse, sexually transmitted diseases and physical injuries are merely part of the outcome.

About the project

Cause of Death: Woman is a unique investigative report on violence against women in the world, describing atrocities ranging from Female Genital Mutilation (FGM) and acid attacks to more hidden types like psychological and physical violence between partners and rape.

Between 2010 and 2012 Linda Forsell documented the situation in ten countries together with reporters Karin Alfredsson and Kerstin Weigl. The countries included in the project are the USA, South Africa, Egypt, Sweden, Pakistan, Mexico, Brazil, Congo, Spain and Russia.

The primary result of the work is www.causeofdeathwoman.com, an open resource for anyone who is interested, but with large focus on reaching out through organizations, schools, workshops and lectures around the world.

1. South Africa: The first time Elizabeth’s boyfriend beat her she was 16. Her boyfriend used to say to her: “You’re a dog. How can you expect anyone to love you when even your own mother doesn’t?”

2. Russia: Svetlana is forced to live with her husband that she has filed a lawsuit against for abusing her. The situation is common in Russia where housing is extremely scarce.

3. Sweden.

4. Brazil: Rosangela says she has survived twice. First when her husband threw petrol over her and set her alight – and then the negligence at the hospital.

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

"The Xikrin-Kayapo: People of the Big Water" - True cost of Brazil’s Belo Monte dam
Zuma Press photographer, Taylor Weidman gives us an inside view of the daily lives of the indigenous Xikrin people living along the Xingo River in the Brazillian Amazon. Their lives are about to change.Photographs by Taylor Weidman/zReportage.com via ZUMA Press “I would like our language and culture to be preserved, to not lose them as other people have,” says Mukuka Xikrin, a young leader from Poti-Kro village of the Xikrin-Kayapo tribe. The Xikrin live on the Bacaja River, a tributary of the Xingu River in the Brazilian Amazon. Just a few miles from Poti-Kro village, the Xingu will soon be home to the third-larget dam in the world, the Belo Monte. Despite over 20 years of indigenous, environmental, and local protest, Belo Monte is reaching peak construction this year, threatening to displace roughly 20,000 people while it converts the power of the Xingu into 11,233 MW of electricity. The government of Brazil is investing heavily in this dam, which is expected to contribute to major development in the country. But what will this mean for local people like the Xikrin who rely on the river for their livelihood? “Everything we need, we have here,” says Ngrenhkarati, a Xikrin woman. “For food we can fish, harvest manioc, and hunt.” The Xikrin live a subsistence lifestyle within the village and depend on the river as a supplier of food, the sole mode of transportation, and a tie to their ancestors. The Xikrin and their relatives, the Kayapó, refer to themselves as Mebengokre, or “People of the Big Water.” But when the Belo Monte dam is complete, the Bacaja will run the risk of running drier and lower, impacting the wildlife of the river. The Xikrin, whose lives, history, traditions, values, and practices depend on the river, have not been given proper consultation under the law and are fighting an uphill battle against the construction of the dam. As construction of Belo Monte reaches its peak this year and the Xikrin adjust to the possibility of life without the “big water,” the Vanishing Cultures Project will travel to the Big Bend and document the culture of the Xikrin before their river heritage is altered forever. (zReportage.com)
(via yahoonewsphotos)
"The Xikrin-Kayapo: People of the Big Water" - True cost of Brazil’s Belo Monte dam
Zuma Press photographer, Taylor Weidman gives us an inside view of the daily lives of the indigenous Xikrin people living along the Xingo River in the Brazillian Amazon. Their lives are about to change.Photographs by Taylor Weidman/zReportage.com via ZUMA Press “I would like our language and culture to be preserved, to not lose them as other people have,” says Mukuka Xikrin, a young leader from Poti-Kro village of the Xikrin-Kayapo tribe. The Xikrin live on the Bacaja River, a tributary of the Xingu River in the Brazilian Amazon. Just a few miles from Poti-Kro village, the Xingu will soon be home to the third-larget dam in the world, the Belo Monte. Despite over 20 years of indigenous, environmental, and local protest, Belo Monte is reaching peak construction this year, threatening to displace roughly 20,000 people while it converts the power of the Xingu into 11,233 MW of electricity. The government of Brazil is investing heavily in this dam, which is expected to contribute to major development in the country. But what will this mean for local people like the Xikrin who rely on the river for their livelihood? “Everything we need, we have here,” says Ngrenhkarati, a Xikrin woman. “For food we can fish, harvest manioc, and hunt.” The Xikrin live a subsistence lifestyle within the village and depend on the river as a supplier of food, the sole mode of transportation, and a tie to their ancestors. The Xikrin and their relatives, the Kayapó, refer to themselves as Mebengokre, or “People of the Big Water.” But when the Belo Monte dam is complete, the Bacaja will run the risk of running drier and lower, impacting the wildlife of the river. The Xikrin, whose lives, history, traditions, values, and practices depend on the river, have not been given proper consultation under the law and are fighting an uphill battle against the construction of the dam. As construction of Belo Monte reaches its peak this year and the Xikrin adjust to the possibility of life without the “big water,” the Vanishing Cultures Project will travel to the Big Bend and document the culture of the Xikrin before their river heritage is altered forever. (zReportage.com)
(via yahoonewsphotos)
"The Xikrin-Kayapo: People of the Big Water" - True cost of Brazil’s Belo Monte dam
Zuma Press photographer, Taylor Weidman gives us an inside view of the daily lives of the indigenous Xikrin people living along the Xingo River in the Brazillian Amazon. Their lives are about to change.Photographs by Taylor Weidman/zReportage.com via ZUMA Press “I would like our language and culture to be preserved, to not lose them as other people have,” says Mukuka Xikrin, a young leader from Poti-Kro village of the Xikrin-Kayapo tribe. The Xikrin live on the Bacaja River, a tributary of the Xingu River in the Brazilian Amazon. Just a few miles from Poti-Kro village, the Xingu will soon be home to the third-larget dam in the world, the Belo Monte. Despite over 20 years of indigenous, environmental, and local protest, Belo Monte is reaching peak construction this year, threatening to displace roughly 20,000 people while it converts the power of the Xingu into 11,233 MW of electricity. The government of Brazil is investing heavily in this dam, which is expected to contribute to major development in the country. But what will this mean for local people like the Xikrin who rely on the river for their livelihood? “Everything we need, we have here,” says Ngrenhkarati, a Xikrin woman. “For food we can fish, harvest manioc, and hunt.” The Xikrin live a subsistence lifestyle within the village and depend on the river as a supplier of food, the sole mode of transportation, and a tie to their ancestors. The Xikrin and their relatives, the Kayapó, refer to themselves as Mebengokre, or “People of the Big Water.” But when the Belo Monte dam is complete, the Bacaja will run the risk of running drier and lower, impacting the wildlife of the river. The Xikrin, whose lives, history, traditions, values, and practices depend on the river, have not been given proper consultation under the law and are fighting an uphill battle against the construction of the dam. As construction of Belo Monte reaches its peak this year and the Xikrin adjust to the possibility of life without the “big water,” the Vanishing Cultures Project will travel to the Big Bend and document the culture of the Xikrin before their river heritage is altered forever. (zReportage.com)
(via yahoonewsphotos)
"The Xikrin-Kayapo: People of the Big Water" - True cost of Brazil’s Belo Monte dam
Zuma Press photographer, Taylor Weidman gives us an inside view of the daily lives of the indigenous Xikrin people living along the Xingo River in the Brazillian Amazon. Their lives are about to change.Photographs by Taylor Weidman/zReportage.com via ZUMA Press “I would like our language and culture to be preserved, to not lose them as other people have,” says Mukuka Xikrin, a young leader from Poti-Kro village of the Xikrin-Kayapo tribe. The Xikrin live on the Bacaja River, a tributary of the Xingu River in the Brazilian Amazon. Just a few miles from Poti-Kro village, the Xingu will soon be home to the third-larget dam in the world, the Belo Monte. Despite over 20 years of indigenous, environmental, and local protest, Belo Monte is reaching peak construction this year, threatening to displace roughly 20,000 people while it converts the power of the Xingu into 11,233 MW of electricity. The government of Brazil is investing heavily in this dam, which is expected to contribute to major development in the country. But what will this mean for local people like the Xikrin who rely on the river for their livelihood? “Everything we need, we have here,” says Ngrenhkarati, a Xikrin woman. “For food we can fish, harvest manioc, and hunt.” The Xikrin live a subsistence lifestyle within the village and depend on the river as a supplier of food, the sole mode of transportation, and a tie to their ancestors. The Xikrin and their relatives, the Kayapó, refer to themselves as Mebengokre, or “People of the Big Water.” But when the Belo Monte dam is complete, the Bacaja will run the risk of running drier and lower, impacting the wildlife of the river. The Xikrin, whose lives, history, traditions, values, and practices depend on the river, have not been given proper consultation under the law and are fighting an uphill battle against the construction of the dam. As construction of Belo Monte reaches its peak this year and the Xikrin adjust to the possibility of life without the “big water,” the Vanishing Cultures Project will travel to the Big Bend and document the culture of the Xikrin before their river heritage is altered forever. (zReportage.com)
(via yahoonewsphotos)

"The Xikrin-Kayapo: People of the Big Water" - True cost of Brazil’s Belo Monte dam

Zuma Press photographer, Taylor Weidman gives us an inside view of the daily lives of the indigenous Xikrin people living along the Xingo River in the Brazillian Amazon. Their lives are about to change.

Photographs by Taylor Weidman/zReportage.com via ZUMA Press

“I would like our language and culture to be preserved, to not lose them as other people have,” says Mukuka Xikrin, a young leader from Poti-Kro village of the Xikrin-Kayapo tribe.

The Xikrin live on the Bacaja River, a tributary of the Xingu River in the Brazilian Amazon. Just a few miles from Poti-Kro village, the Xingu will soon be home to the third-larget dam in the world, the Belo Monte. Despite over 20 years of indigenous, environmental, and local protest, Belo Monte is reaching peak construction this year, threatening to displace roughly 20,000 people while it converts the power of the Xingu into 11,233 MW of electricity.

The government of Brazil is investing heavily in this dam, which is expected to contribute to major development in the country. But what will this mean for local people like the Xikrin who rely on the river for their livelihood?

“Everything we need, we have here,” says Ngrenhkarati, a Xikrin woman. “For food we can fish, harvest manioc, and hunt.”

The Xikrin live a subsistence lifestyle within the village and depend on the river as a supplier of food, the sole mode of transportation, and a tie to their ancestors. The Xikrin and their relatives, the Kayapó, refer to themselves as Mebengokre, or “People of the Big Water.”

But when the Belo Monte dam is complete, the Bacaja will run the risk of running drier and lower, impacting the wildlife of the river. The Xikrin, whose lives, history, traditions, values, and practices depend on the river, have not been given proper consultation under the law and are fighting an uphill battle against the construction of the dam.

As construction of Belo Monte reaches its peak this year and the Xikrin adjust to the possibility of life without the “big water,” the Vanishing Cultures Project will travel to the Big Bend and document the culture of the Xikrin before their river heritage is altered forever. (zReportage.com)

(via yahoonewsphotos)

A member of the Guarani Nandeva tribe stands watch at a roadblock they built to keep farmers out after they occupied a farm they claim is part of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvy Katu, in the Japora municipality of Mato Grosso do Sul state, near the southern border with Paraguay, on November 22, 2013. Guarani Indians occupied 14 farms in Japora during this past October, claiming it is part of the land legally declared as Indian land by the Supreme Court in 2005, although still waiting to be signed into law by Brazil’s president since then.
[Credit : Lunae Parracho/Reuters]

A member of the Guarani Nandeva tribe stands watch at a roadblock they built to keep farmers out after they occupied a farm they claim is part of the ancestral land they call Tekoha Yvy Katu, in the Japora municipality of Mato Grosso do Sul state, near the southern border with Paraguay, on November 22, 2013. Guarani Indians occupied 14 farms in Japora during this past October, claiming it is part of the land legally declared as Indian land by the Supreme Court in 2005, although still waiting to be signed into law by Brazil’s president since then.

[Credit : Lunae Parracho/Reuters]