Tag: earthquake

A damaged old tower is seen after an earthquake in Finale Emilia, Italy May 20, 2012. A strong earthquake rocked a large swathe of northern Italy early on Sunday, killing at least three people and causing serious damage to the area’s cultural heritage. The epicentre of the 6.0 magnitude quake, the strongest to hit Italy in three years, was in the plains near Modena in the Emilia-Romagna region of the Po River Valley.
[Credit : Giorgio Benvenuti/Reuters]

A damaged old tower is seen after an earthquake in Finale Emilia, Italy May 20, 2012. A strong earthquake rocked a large swathe of northern Italy early on Sunday, killing at least three people and causing serious damage to the area’s cultural heritage. The epicentre of the 6.0 magnitude quake, the strongest to hit Italy in three years, was in the plains near Modena in the Emilia-Romagna region of the Po River Valley.

[Credit : Giorgio Benvenuti/Reuters]

Children and adults scavenge for recyclables and other usable items at the Trutier dump on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, on March 7 in Haiti. Following the devastating earthquake in Haiti two years ago that killed an estimated 316,000 people and left even more people homeless, the number of scavengers at the Trutier landfill outside Port-au-Prince, Haiti has grown from about 200 to an estimated 2,000. Much of Haiti is still in a crisis situation with tens of thousands living in tent camps in and around Port-au-Prince.
[Credit : Spencer Platt / Getty Images]

Children and adults scavenge for recyclables and other usable items at the Trutier dump on the outskirts of Port-au-Prince, on March 7 in Haiti. Following the devastating earthquake in Haiti two years ago that killed an estimated 316,000 people and left even more people homeless, the number of scavengers at the Trutier landfill outside Port-au-Prince, Haiti has grown from about 200 to an estimated 2,000. Much of Haiti is still in a crisis situation with tens of thousands living in tent camps in and around Port-au-Prince.

[Credit : Spencer Platt / Getty Images]

Primitivo Magalso shows the photo and ID of his missing children next to his destroyed house on the slope of a mountain which collapsed at the height of the powerful earthquake,in the village of Songgon, La Libertad town, Negros Oriental province, central Philippines on Feb. 8. Survivors of a deadly quake in the Philippines begged rescuers to keep searching for dozens of people buried in landslides, but officials said hopes of finding them alive were dim.
[Credit : Ted Aljibe / AFP / Getty Images]

Primitivo Magalso shows the photo and ID of his missing children next to his destroyed house on the slope of a mountain which collapsed at the height of the powerful earthquake,in the village of Songgon, La Libertad town, Negros Oriental province, central Philippines on Feb. 8. Survivors of a deadly quake in the Philippines begged rescuers to keep searching for dozens of people buried in landslides, but officials said hopes of finding them alive were dim.

[Credit : Ted Aljibe / AFP / Getty Images]

Fukushima Silence
(via Reuters)
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.
Photos, January 15, 2012 : 
#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 
#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.
#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.
#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.
#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.
#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]
Fukushima Silence
(via Reuters)
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.
Photos, January 15, 2012 : 
#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 
#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.
#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.
#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.
#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.
#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]
Fukushima Silence
(via Reuters)
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.
Photos, January 15, 2012 : 
#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 
#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.
#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.
#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.
#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.
#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]
Fukushima Silence
(via Reuters)
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.
Photos, January 15, 2012 : 
#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 
#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.
#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.
#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.
#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.
#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]
Fukushima Silence
(via Reuters)
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.
Photos, January 15, 2012 : 
#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 
#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.
#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.
#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.
#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.
#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]
Fukushima Silence
(via Reuters)
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.
Photos, January 15, 2012 : 
#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 
#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.
#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.
#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.
#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.
#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]
Fukushima Silence
(via Reuters)
The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.
Photos, January 15, 2012 : 
#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 
#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.
#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.
#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.
#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.
#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.
[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]

Fukushima Silence

(via Reuters)

The Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant was hit on March 11, 2011 by a tsunami that exceeded 15 metres in some areas. The tsunami knocked out the plant’s cooling systems, resulting in meltdowns of nuclear fuel, and became the world’s worst atomic crisis in 25 years. The government announced in December that reactors at the plant had reached a state of cold shutdown, a milestone in cleanup efforts and a pre-condition for allowing the return of about 80,000 residents evacuated from a 20km (12 miles) radius of the Daiichi plant. The government also said it would draw up new evacuation zones by the end of April, and areas where annual radiation levels are currently higher than 50 millisieverts would not be deemed suitable for living for at least five years.

PhotosJanuary 15, 2012 

#1 : An ostrich which had escaped from a farm walks past a car in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant. 

#2 : An empty shopping street is seen in Tomioka town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant, Fukushima prefecture.

#3 : A herd of cows which escaped from a livestock farm walk in a field in Okuma town.

#4 : An empty shopping street, under a sign reading “Nuclear Power - The Energy for a Better Future”, is seen at the entrance of Futaba town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

#5 : Abandoned wheelchairs are seen outside Okuma Town Health Center in Okuma town.

#6 : A games arcade destroyed by the 2011 earthquake is seen along Route 6 in Tomioka town.

#7 : Fallen gravestones are seen at a cemetery in Namie town, inside the exclusion zone around the crippled Fukushima Daiichi nuclear power plant.

[Credit : Stringer/Reuters]

(Source: fotojournalismus)