Tag: photo

newyorker:

Kim Badwai: Life in Tahrir Square
For Peter Hessler’s report from the Egyptian revolution in this week’s magazine, the photographer Kim Badawi focussed his attention on the Omar Makram mosque in Tahrir Square. Badawi, who is of Egyptian, French, and Slovenian  ancestry, moved to Cairo earlier this year. Living in his grandparents’  apartment with a direct view of the square, Badawi has witnessed not  only the tanks and tear gas but also quieter moments that speak just as  clearly about the protesters’ perseverance.
Badawi shares his  thoughts and more photos on our Photo Booth blog:http://nyr.kr/w2ZhSR
newyorker:

Kim Badwai: Life in Tahrir Square
For Peter Hessler’s report from the Egyptian revolution in this week’s magazine, the photographer Kim Badawi focussed his attention on the Omar Makram mosque in Tahrir Square. Badawi, who is of Egyptian, French, and Slovenian  ancestry, moved to Cairo earlier this year. Living in his grandparents’  apartment with a direct view of the square, Badawi has witnessed not  only the tanks and tear gas but also quieter moments that speak just as  clearly about the protesters’ perseverance.
Badawi shares his  thoughts and more photos on our Photo Booth blog:http://nyr.kr/w2ZhSR
newyorker:

Kim Badwai: Life in Tahrir Square
For Peter Hessler’s report from the Egyptian revolution in this week’s magazine, the photographer Kim Badawi focussed his attention on the Omar Makram mosque in Tahrir Square. Badawi, who is of Egyptian, French, and Slovenian  ancestry, moved to Cairo earlier this year. Living in his grandparents’  apartment with a direct view of the square, Badawi has witnessed not  only the tanks and tear gas but also quieter moments that speak just as  clearly about the protesters’ perseverance.
Badawi shares his  thoughts and more photos on our Photo Booth blog:http://nyr.kr/w2ZhSR

newyorker:

Kim Badwai: Life in Tahrir Square

For Peter Hessler’s report from the Egyptian revolution in this week’s magazine, the photographer Kim Badawi focussed his attention on the Omar Makram mosque in Tahrir Square. Badawi, who is of Egyptian, French, and Slovenian ancestry, moved to Cairo earlier this year. Living in his grandparents’ apartment with a direct view of the square, Badawi has witnessed not only the tanks and tear gas but also quieter moments that speak just as clearly about the protesters’ perseverance.

Badawi shares his thoughts and more photos on our Photo Booth blog:http://nyr.kr/w2ZhSR

newyorker:

Bipolar: Scott Sternbach at the Earth’s Extremes
In 2008, the photographer Scott Sternbach travelled to the world’s southern extreme to create “Antarctic Souls,”  a project that focussed on the thirty-odd researchers, biologists,  cooks, pilots, and boat captains who are involved in a federal project  to study the effects of global warming on the region. Sternbach, who  currently serves as the director of photography at LaGuardia Community  College, has long dreamed of visiting the far north as well. He recently  got his chance thanks to a grant from CUNY, which sent  him to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, where he spent  eight weeks photographing one of the state’s last living tribes, the  Neetsaii Gwich’in.
- Click through to read about Sternbach’s experience, and for more photographs from his time among the Neetsaii Gwich’in: http://nyr.kr/tSXoTz
newyorker:

Bipolar: Scott Sternbach at the Earth’s Extremes
In 2008, the photographer Scott Sternbach travelled to the world’s southern extreme to create “Antarctic Souls,”  a project that focussed on the thirty-odd researchers, biologists,  cooks, pilots, and boat captains who are involved in a federal project  to study the effects of global warming on the region. Sternbach, who  currently serves as the director of photography at LaGuardia Community  College, has long dreamed of visiting the far north as well. He recently  got his chance thanks to a grant from CUNY, which sent  him to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, where he spent  eight weeks photographing one of the state’s last living tribes, the  Neetsaii Gwich’in.
- Click through to read about Sternbach’s experience, and for more photographs from his time among the Neetsaii Gwich’in: http://nyr.kr/tSXoTz
newyorker:

Bipolar: Scott Sternbach at the Earth’s Extremes
In 2008, the photographer Scott Sternbach travelled to the world’s southern extreme to create “Antarctic Souls,”  a project that focussed on the thirty-odd researchers, biologists,  cooks, pilots, and boat captains who are involved in a federal project  to study the effects of global warming on the region. Sternbach, who  currently serves as the director of photography at LaGuardia Community  College, has long dreamed of visiting the far north as well. He recently  got his chance thanks to a grant from CUNY, which sent  him to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, where he spent  eight weeks photographing one of the state’s last living tribes, the  Neetsaii Gwich’in.
- Click through to read about Sternbach’s experience, and for more photographs from his time among the Neetsaii Gwich’in: http://nyr.kr/tSXoTz
newyorker:

Bipolar: Scott Sternbach at the Earth’s Extremes
In 2008, the photographer Scott Sternbach travelled to the world’s southern extreme to create “Antarctic Souls,”  a project that focussed on the thirty-odd researchers, biologists,  cooks, pilots, and boat captains who are involved in a federal project  to study the effects of global warming on the region. Sternbach, who  currently serves as the director of photography at LaGuardia Community  College, has long dreamed of visiting the far north as well. He recently  got his chance thanks to a grant from CUNY, which sent  him to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, where he spent  eight weeks photographing one of the state’s last living tribes, the  Neetsaii Gwich’in.
- Click through to read about Sternbach’s experience, and for more photographs from his time among the Neetsaii Gwich’in: http://nyr.kr/tSXoTz
newyorker:

Bipolar: Scott Sternbach at the Earth’s Extremes
In 2008, the photographer Scott Sternbach travelled to the world’s southern extreme to create “Antarctic Souls,”  a project that focussed on the thirty-odd researchers, biologists,  cooks, pilots, and boat captains who are involved in a federal project  to study the effects of global warming on the region. Sternbach, who  currently serves as the director of photography at LaGuardia Community  College, has long dreamed of visiting the far north as well. He recently  got his chance thanks to a grant from CUNY, which sent  him to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, where he spent  eight weeks photographing one of the state’s last living tribes, the  Neetsaii Gwich’in.
- Click through to read about Sternbach’s experience, and for more photographs from his time among the Neetsaii Gwich’in: http://nyr.kr/tSXoTz
newyorker:

Bipolar: Scott Sternbach at the Earth’s Extremes
In 2008, the photographer Scott Sternbach travelled to the world’s southern extreme to create “Antarctic Souls,”  a project that focussed on the thirty-odd researchers, biologists,  cooks, pilots, and boat captains who are involved in a federal project  to study the effects of global warming on the region. Sternbach, who  currently serves as the director of photography at LaGuardia Community  College, has long dreamed of visiting the far north as well. He recently  got his chance thanks to a grant from CUNY, which sent  him to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, where he spent  eight weeks photographing one of the state’s last living tribes, the  Neetsaii Gwich’in.
- Click through to read about Sternbach’s experience, and for more photographs from his time among the Neetsaii Gwich’in: http://nyr.kr/tSXoTz

newyorker:

Bipolar: Scott Sternbach at the Earth’s Extremes

In 2008, the photographer Scott Sternbach travelled to the world’s southern extreme to create “Antarctic Souls,” a project that focussed on the thirty-odd researchers, biologists, cooks, pilots, and boat captains who are involved in a federal project to study the effects of global warming on the region. Sternbach, who currently serves as the director of photography at LaGuardia Community College, has long dreamed of visiting the far north as well. He recently got his chance thanks to a grant from CUNY, which sent him to the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge, in Alaska, where he spent eight weeks photographing one of the state’s last living tribes, the Neetsaii Gwich’in.

- Click through to read about Sternbach’s experience, and for more photographs from his time among the Neetsaii Gwich’in: http://nyr.kr/tSXoTz

life:

On this day in 1865, the 13th amendment is ratified — this officially ended slavery.
The Civil War was a fight about competing freedoms: the freedom to  choose one’s own government, the freedom of states to leave a  federation, the freedom of people to decide their own laws. But in the  end, the freedom that prevailed was the one that declared that all men  are to be considered human beings, not property. 
Integral to the fight  for that principle — on the front lines, building military  infrastructure, and carrying vital information — were African  Americans, many of them escaped slaves who risked their lives as the  fate of future generations hung in the balance.
(see more — African Americans in the Civil War)

life:

On this day in 1865, the 13th amendment is ratified — this officially ended slavery.

The Civil War was a fight about competing freedoms: the freedom to choose one’s own government, the freedom of states to leave a federation, the freedom of people to decide their own laws. But in the end, the freedom that prevailed was the one that declared that all men are to be considered human beings, not property.

Integral to the fight for that principle — on the front lines, building military infrastructure, and carrying vital information — were African Americans, many of them escaped slaves who risked their lives as the fate of future generations hung in the balance.

(see more African Americans in the Civil War)

life:

The SlutWalk is an idea — and a movement — that started in Canada, as a  protest against the notion that victims of sexual assault somehow  invite or deserve abuse because of what they are wearing or the way they  are behaving when they’re attacked. Since the first SlutWalk in Canada  in April 2011, similar marches have been held in cities around the  globe, with women and men protesting the incredibly offensive idea that  victims of rape and other crimes are somehow asking for it …
Here, more photos from SlutWalks Around the World.

life:

The SlutWalk is an ideaand a movement — that started in Canada, as a protest against the notion that victims of sexual assault somehow invite or deserve abuse because of what they are wearing or the way they are behaving when they’re attacked. Since the first SlutWalk in Canada in April 2011, similar marches have been held in cities around the globe, with women and men protesting the incredibly offensive idea that victims of rape and other crimes are somehow asking for it

Here, more photos from SlutWalks Around the World.

(Source: fotojournalismus)